2.3 Matching CO2 sources and potential co2 storage sites in India

Figure 2.9 Geographical relationship between existing CO2 sources and sedimentary basins in India

Figure 2.6 shows the geographical relationship between the major sources of CO2 in India and the sedimentary basins with good, fair and limited storage potential. N.B. The basins rated as good are the hydrocarbon-bearing basins, so they also contain all the potential in oil and gas fields.

Figure 2.9 Geographical relationship between existing CO2 sources and sedimentary basins in India

It may be seen that sources in the NW of peninsula India and along the SE coast have good nearby storage potential, whereas those in SE, Central and northern India do not. However, there is a large area of fair potential in the Mahanadi Basin, where there is a fair chance that emissions from the major clusters of sources in the NE peninsula India could be stored. The good potential in Assam and the Assam-Arakan Fold Belt appears to be stranded.

Figure 2.7 shows the relationship between the planned new CO2 sources and the sedimentary basins with good or fair storage potential. The nine planned ultra mega power plants are identified separately.

Figure 2.10 Geographical relationship between planned CO2 sources and sedimentary basins in India

The geographical relationships are essentially similar. Again it may be seen that many of the planned sources are distant from sedimentary basins with good storage potential, and the good potential in Assam and the Assam-Arakan fold belt appears stranded. Nevertheless there are several major sources on the SE coast and the area NE of Mumbai that appear well placed to take advantage of CCS technology.