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Publication date:
08 Mar 2011
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The Global Status of CCS: 2010

This report consolidates the current understanding of the level and nature (both public and private) of global CCS activities, as well as the major opportunities and challenges experienced by large-scale integrated projects (LSIPs). The report also seeks to assist domestic governments focus their responses to accelerate the demonstration phase of CCS in order to bring forward the point in time when CCS can be deployed commercially.

In Chapter 2, entitled ‘Policy frameworks and public financial support’, the nature and scope of global public financial support for CCS demonstration is characterised. Although substantial programs for supporting CCS have been announced by governments, for many, the process of implementing the program and allocating support to specific projects is still underway. Input-based grant programs awarded on a competitive basis are the most prominent of policy mechanisms.

Chapter 3 entitled ‘CCS projects’ gauges global CCS activity at the project level. Although it indicates a number of projects have been newly identified during the past year (across the various stages of the technology innovation chain), it also reveals that many previously commenced projects have been delayed or cancelled due to investment uncertainty or due to technological reasons. Another looming challenge for the CCS community is that, while the vast majority of planned LSIPs are located in developed regions and concentrated in the power sector, future emission growth challenges are increasingly found in the developing regions and other industry sectors.

Chapter 4 entitled ‘CO2 storage’ maps the status of efforts to better understand and assess viable storage sites with suitable geology, capacity and injectivity. In the longer term, as carbon constraints tighten, the associated investment in commercial CO2 capture plants and common user infrastructure will increasingly depend on access to suitable storage solutions.

Chapter 5 entitled ‘CO2 networks for CCS’ gives an account of the status of CO2 networks for advancing CCS. This includes proposals for establishing new networks specifically for CCS, as well as leveraging off the existing CO2 infrastructure for EOR in North America. Overall, the benefits of a ‘network’ approach is influencing a significant share of proposed large-scale demonstration projects, though it could also introduce additional costs and risks.

Chapter 6 entitled ‘Legal and regulatory developments’ provides an update on global progress in implementing frameworks to regulate demonstration projects as well as to support large-scale commercialisation of CCS solutions. Efforts are focused on how long-term liability is currently being addressed, treatment of associated property rights, post-closure site stewardship, and the increasingly important requirement by many sovereign governments for new coal-fired plants to be ‘CCS ready’.

Chapter 7 entitled “CCS costs and financing’ focuses on public information on costs that emerged during 2010. This includes three full technology comparison studies undertaken by the International Energy Agency (IEA), the United States Department of Energy (DoE) and WorleyParsons. In addition, costs from emerging projects are presented and contrasted. The challenges of uncertainty, both in technology and financing, arising from the initial large upfront investment costs for large-scale demonstrations continues to have an impact on the investment environment.

Chapter 8 entitled ‘Regional CCS knowledge-sharing initiatives’ presents a review of regional CCS knowledge-sharing initiatives and their development from mid-2009 to late 2010. Specifically, it examines the frameworks established to collect and share knowledge created from publicly funded demonstration projects in a number of regions across the globe.

Finally, Chapter 9 entitled ‘CCS public engagement’ summarises the vitally important approaches being employed to engage and inform the public in relation to CCS project developments. It highlights key themes and guidelines to help provide project proponents with an understanding of the factors affecting the development of effective public engagement strategies.

Organisation 
Global CCS Institute
Topics 
Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS)

This report consolidates the current understanding of the level and nature (both public and private) of global CCS activities, as well as the major opportunities and challenges experienced by large-scale integrated projects (LSIPs). The report also seeks to assist domestic governments focus their responses to accelerate the demonstration phase of CCS in order to bring forward the point in time when CCS can be deployed commercially.

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