CO2 capture technologies: oxy combustion with CO2 capture

This report provides an update for oxyfuel-combustion carbon capture in the power industry. It was developed by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) on behalf of the Global CCS Institute.

In the oxyfuel-combustion processes, the bulk nitrogen is removed from the air before combustion. The resulting combustion products will have CO2 content up to about 90 per cent (dry basis). The flue gas impurities (predominantly O2, N2, and Ar) may be removed by reducing the flue gas (at moderate pressure) to a temperature at which the CO2 condenses and the impurities do not. Oxyfuel-combustion may be employed with solid fuels such as coal, petroleum coke, and biomass, as well as liquid and gaseous fuels.

Some key points raised in the oxyfuel-combustion carbon capture report are:

  • The oxyfuel-combustion/CO2 capture power plant designs being developed and deployed for service in the next four or five years are based on individual component technologies and arrangements which have demonstrated sufficient maturity, with the greatest remaining technical challenge being integrating the systems into a complete steam-electric power plant.
  • By its nature, an oxyfuel-coal power plant is likely to be a 'near zero' emitter of all criteria pollutants.
  • Existing air-fired power plants might be retrofitted with an air separation unit, oxyfuel-fired burners, flue gas recycle, and a CO2 processing unit, with the large fleet of air-fired power plants in service calling for more study of this option.
  • Future efficiency improvements to the oxyfuel-combustion process for power generation point toward an oxyfuel-combustion plant with near zero emissions of conventional pollutants, up to 98 per cent CO2 capture, and efficiency comparable to the best power plants currently being built.
Organisation 
Global CCS Institute
Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)
Topics 
Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS)
CO2 capture

This report provides an update for oxy-fuel carbon capture in the power industry. It was developed by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) on behalf of the Global CCS Institute.

Was it helpful?

We value your feedback about this content. Please let us know what you think: