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APEC workshop on the use of CO2 in Mexico

This October, over 200 delegates from academia, industry and government joined an APEC Workshop in Mexico City to discuss carbon capture and storage and use (CCUS) of carbon dioxide (CO2). Sponsored by the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC), the Global CCS Institute organised the second of three workshops for Mexican stakeholders interested in CCUS, held on October 13-14, at the impressive CFE Technology Museum in Mexico City.

With leading international speakers from the United States, Canada, Norway and Belgium, the meeting provided a high level summary of the status of CCS/CCUS projects and programs and introduced CCS and use of CO2. The workshop gave delegates a detailed overview on CO2 capture technologies, including post-combustion, pre-combustion, oxy-combustion and CO2 capture in industrial processes. As a result of attending the workshop, delegates came away with an understanding of the current status of CO2 capture, transport of CO2 and geological storage and use of CO2, as well as knowledge of existing best practices and appreciation of challenges ahead for commercial deployment of CCS/CCUS.

Delegates heard presentations from the Mexican partners for the workshop who included: SECRETARÍA DE ENERGÍA (SENER), Comisión Federal de Electricidad (CFE), FECIT, PEMEX, and SEMARNAT (Secretariat of Environment and Natural Resources).

Find the agenda for the workshop here

This workshop is the second in a series of three workshops that the Institute is organizing in Mexico on behalf of APEC. Presentations from the first workshop are also available.

The above presentation is an overview of APEC presented by Robert Wright of the US Department of Energy. The rest of the presentations given during the session are available via the links below:

 

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